Your Child's First Visit

The guidelines have changed! In order to prevent early childhood cavities it is recommended that your child see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth erupts or no later than their first birthday.

The guidelines have changed! In order to prevent early childhood cavities it is recommended that your child see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth erupts or no later than their first birthday.

This allows Dr. Espinosa to develop a prevention plan unique to your child’s needs and family life. In addition, early exposure to a kid friendly dental environment will help the patient feel more comfortable at the office and ensure a positive dental experience at an earlier age. Following your child’s first dental visit it is recommended to maintain twice yearly dental exams to monitor their oral health, growth, and development.

Establishing A “Dental Home”

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Dental Association (ADA), and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) all recommend establishing a “Dental Home” for your child by one year of age. Children who have a dental home are more likely to receive appropriate preventive and routine oral health care.

The Dental Home is intended to provide a place other than the Emergency Room for parents.

You can make the first visit to the dentist enjoyable and positive. If old enough, your child should be informed of the visit and told that the dentist and their staff will explain all procedures and answer any questions. The less to-do concerning the visit, the better.

It is best if you refrain from using words around your child that might cause unnecessary fear, such as needle, pull, drill or hurt. Pediatric dental offices make a practice of using words that convey the same message, but are pleasant and non-frightening to the child.

Why are primary (baby) teeth important?

  • Essential for eating naturally and obtaining nutrients
  • Maintain space for the permanent teeth and guide them into the correct position
  • Aid in speech development and facial appearance
  • Infection of a primary tooth can affect the development of the permanent tooth and can cause pain or discomfort, which may disrupt school or daily activities

You can make the first visit to the dentist enjoyable and positive. If old enough, your child should be informed of the visit and told that the dentist and their staff will explain all procedures and answer any questions. The less to-do concerning the visit, the better.

It is best if you refrain from using words around your child that might cause unnecessary fear, such as “needle”, “shot”, “pull”, “drill” or “hurt”. The office makes a practice of using words that convey the same message, but are pleasant and non-frightening to the child.